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hremon716
Feb 27, 2022
In Question 2
Your email marketing cost can be difficult to measure unless you manage the email marketing budget. This cost takes into account both your tools and your team (including agencies, contractors, and freelancers). ROI, and in particular potential ROI , is the perfect way to get a budget for more resources or to buy into a new project. Image of person looking at report on laptop What leads to better ROI? The average email marketing ROI is 36:1, but some brands get way more than that. Find out which factors correlate with higher returns in our CMO's Guide to Email Marketing ROI (Not Just for CMOs!). Download the free report → Before emails forwarded from Litmus Email Analytics Email forwards are the number of times users click the forward function in their email client after opening your email. Simple enough, right? This is something you want to keep track of if your goal is to create share-worthy content. To get this: Forwarding rate = (number of emails forwarded / number of emails opened) x 100 prints printed emails from Litmus Email Analytics Impressions measures the number of people who click on the impression function in the email client after opening your email. Consider this metric for coupons that need to be printed and brought to the store, as well Image Masking Service as items such as directions, directions, tickets, or confirmations. Here's how to get that number: Impression rate = (number of emails printed / number of emails opened) x 100 Mailing list size or growth rate Without a mailing list, you have no one to send your emails to. What if your list doesn't grow? Then your email program can't grow either. Mailing list growth is how much your list is growing instead of churning. So you always want it to be positive. To calculate this: List Growth Rate ((New Monthly Subscribers - Monthly Subscribers) / List Size) x 100 Feel free to swap the monthly period with one that makes sense for your brand. Alternatively, you can look at the unsubscribe rate which measures the number of people removed or removed from your mailing list. This would include unsubscribes, bounces, manual deletions, or even unengaged subscribers. It's good to have this number so you know how much you need to grow your list to have a positive growth rate. Here's how to get it: Churn rate = (monthly unsubscribed subscribers / list size at start of month) x 100 Litmus Marketing Guide to Revenue: Mailing Lists Healthy mailing list. Healthy ROI. Subscribers fuel the overall success of your email program. Learn how to get more good subscribers. And more income. Get the guide →
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hremon716
Feb 27, 2022
In What is Technology
To get started, look at what triggers these campaigns. Often, re-engagement campaigns rely heavily on open rate data. At Litmus, we're redefining re-engagement for our own lists using opens and clicks. Why keep openings in there? Because not all emails have a call to action that requires a click. That, and not everyone uses Apple Mail! So, for the time being, we are maintaining openings within our engagement criteria. Next, look at how your emails are written. Are you saying things like "You haven't opened our emails in a while"? Change the verbiage to reflect low engagement, but don't open specifically. 2. Send a reconfirmation campaign Reconfirmation campaigns allow subscribers to continue subscribing to your emails or unsubscribe. Since we can no longer rely solely on openers to clean our lists, this helps you maintain list hygiene and deliverability. A bonus here is that you get an explicit option to email these people. So, even if it is not mandatory at all levels, it could be in the future. Better to have this option explicit, isn't it? Common sense: Consider sending your reconfirmation campaign more than once to people who haven't reconfirmed, because people may not see your email for a variety of reasons. You can also use other metrics, such as website activity or other email interaction, to understand E-Commerce Photo Editing Service if they are still interacting with you in some capacity. 3. Create a reliable opening audience Do you know how the MPP will affect you? You can measure the impact of this upcoming change in email performance measurement by segmenting your audience by email client device. Not only will this help you understand the extent of the impact, but it will also help you prepare for rough email engagement in the future. Some email service providers (ESPs) can help you determine this segmentation by email client, but if yours doesn't provide open email client data, you can use Litmus Email Analytics to get this breakdown. Device identification analysis can help you create an audience segment known to use non-Apple email clients. This segment will continue to provide accurate open data after MPP rolls out this fall. (Learn more about how to build a reliable opening audience using non-Apple email clients.) In addition to using this list as an open proxy, consider this: Is the play time for Apple device subscribers similar? If so, you can use read time from Gmail and Outlook, for example, as a proxy for your email read time in the future.
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hremon716
Feb 27, 2022
In What is Technology
Consumer privacy is a huge trend permeating marketing as a whole, and email marketing in particular in the coming months. With the rollout of Apple Mail privacy protection in September, the way we “do email” is changing. We need to prepare for a season of blind theft and identify new ways to measure email performance. In part two of our Ultimate Email Summit online event, Jessica Raggio (Vice President of Product Marketing at Litmus), John Billington (Director of Product Management at Litmus) and I share practical tips to help you preparing for the future of information and analytics. Didn't attend the live webinar? Its good. We recorded everything. Watch the recording here or read the recap below: What privacy changes are happening? In the live webinar, we covered two big changes that will impact marketing: Apple Mail Privacy Protection and the end of third-party cookies. Third-party (3P) cookies are text files that store data about web experiences on different websites and help inform companies about who visits their own websites. While this will impact demand generation teams more, the end of 3P cookies is going to mean a focus on first-party data, and email is a key Image Masking Service driver of that. Mail Privacy Protection (MPP) prevents senders from collecting certain email data about Apple Mail users. This prevents senders from knowing if and when they open an email. And it hides their IP address so it can't be linked to other online activity or used to determine their location. It also hides their device information so you can't tell if the subscriber is using an iPhone or a Mac. This is important because you won't be able to track who opened your emails and when through Apple Mail. And because Apple's caching servers will inflate the total number of opens and make it very difficult to get an accurate open rate. We asked you all what you think had a bigger impact, and the answer was clear: protecting email privacy all the way. LinkedIn Poll: What do you think will affect your messaging program the most? 37% said loss of third-party cookies and 63% said Apple's email privacy protection See the survey on LinkedIn Despite the impending changes to email, we don't believe email is dead. We've gone through changes before (looking at you, GDPR, CASL, and CCPA), and we'll do it again. With that in mind, we've talked about the impact of MPP on email marketers and some practical steps to prepare for in the months ahead. Share them with you here now. 6 Tips to Prepare for Mail Privacy While there are still many unknowns, there are ways to start taking action based on what we know.
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